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. >> the british citizens detained in bahrain claim that what they were tortured. what is wrong with pakistan? we will discuss this with out what the country has to say for themselves. >> what is that? >> you might know that some but do you know who wrote it? the director takes on a screen writer who feels undervalued. >> president obama does not have to go very far to find enemy is these days, he has plenty at home. it was with some relief that he faced mahmoud ahmadinejad at the u.n. he said that the the door still open to diplomacy should iran choose to walk through it. >> each year in september, mahmoud ahmadinejad travels to the u.s. for the united nations general assembly in new york. he and the american president speak on the same day. the iranian leader was in fine form. >> it was said that some 3000 people were killed on september 11th for which we are all very saddened. up until now, in afghanistan and iraq, hundreds of thousands of people have been killed, millions have been wounded and displaced and the conflict is still going on. >> when questioned who was behind 9/11, the diplomats
pakistan. there are thousands of these camps scattered throughout the entire country, necessary because so many millions of people remain displaced more than a month into this flooding. they talk about 17 million people being displaced and people are getting sick in hospitals as well. we're going to look at the journey of people who live like this and then get sick. we're also going to talk about something critically important, aid, basic aid, food, water, medical supplies. how does it reach the people who need it the most? and finally, there is some hope out there. people who have dreams and aspirations who want to make something of themselves, even using tents like this to start an education. let's get started. we've seen a lot of hopeful things here in pakistan over the last week. people trying to get themselves out of terrible situations. we've also seen what happens when people become desperate, when the supplies just aren't coming in fast enough. and sometimes it can be very heartbreaking. take a look. ever wonder what desperation looks like? this is it. the police are coming in to b
like this to start an education. let's get started. we've seen a lot of hopeful things here in pakistan over the last week. people trying to get themselves out of terrible situations. we've also seen what happens when people become desperate, when the supplies just aren't coming in fast enough. and sometimes it can be very heartbreaking. take a look. ever wonder what desperation looks like? this is it. the police are coming in to basically break up this demonstration. what happened here was, locals basically set up a roadblock right over here. as soon as an aid truck would come in, they would basically storm that aid truck and try and steal as many supplies as they could. they're desperate. they're quick to tell you about it. it wasn't so much anger as it was bitter frustration and hopelessness. thousands of displaced people being forgotten and ignored. here's how it's supposed to work. a much more organized camp, for example. a family over here, they have mats, they have tents that can withstand a lot of the rain that's coming. if you look inside this tent over here you see water drugs
go up right? >> everybody. >> greta: here's what i think is appalling. every year we give pakistan 1.5 billion dollars. last fall we gave them an additional tip, 7.5 billion dollars. we are giving them hundreds of millions of dollars in disaster relief. i don't have no clue how much we give them in the military my guess is billions. >> it is. >> according to secretary of state clinton and others the rich in pakistan don't pay taxes. so, we pay for what the people of pakistan, the rich or even the middle class impact standard is coming from us. >> here's our dilemma. if we don't support the pakistan army to make them better equipped to fight terrorism on their side of the border, americans are going to get killed. i'd like to fix pakistan's tax problems. we tax too much. we take too much from the american people to run this government. and we spend too much. my focus is on making sure we win in afghanistan you have to have a stable reliable partner in afghanistan. the money we are giving this military sis tans to make sure they can fight terrorists on their side of the border more eff
of a movement and one of pakistan's most controversial political parties. in the pakistani city, there was shock and grief at the loss of one of the party's stars. hussein declared a 10-day mourning period. but dr. farooq had enemies as well as friends here. he left in 1992 after authorities accused him of murder and kidnapped. he claimed the charges were false and politically motivated. after several years on the run, he arrived in london and claimed political asylum. british police have said nothing about who may have killed him. just that he suffered head injuries and stab wounds. as investigators try to piece together his final moments, many in pakistan will be watching closely. "bbc news." >> our correspondent, who is in pakistan, says dr. farooq has always denied the charges he faced in pakistan. >> dr. farooq is a wanted man in pakistan. he has been charged in at least 60 cases involving kidnapping and murder of political opponents. he has always denied these charges, which have been claimed against other senior leaders. they said they were politically motivated. they were all registered
americans accused of spying and iran will not be released. a planning a comeback, pakistan's former military ruler tells the bbc he is forming a political party and wants to lead the country again. and if it is september, it must be toronto, a hollywood a-lister heading to canada for the international film festival. >>> welcome to "bbc world news," broadcasting in the u.k. and around the world. the american pastor who drew international condemnation for planning to burn the car ran up on the anniversary of 9/11 has arrived in new york, where he is expected to meet the iman behind plans for a controversy a mosque near ground zero. pastor terry jones says it may still happen. >> the president was forced to spend a fair bit of a rare news conference making appeals for tolerance, saying that muslims were neighbors and friends. he can hardly not respond to the threats. the trouble is it looks like he is giving more publicity to a group that is on the fringe. pastor jones is the leader of a florida church with a congregation of about 50 people. he believes that islam is the work of the devil and h
pakistan. unless the army is willing to pressure the taliban using safe havens to launch cross border attacks against american soldiers, it will be impossible to defeat the taliban. it's a small step forward. but without pakistan doing more, it's not going to solve the situation. >> with that said, i keep thinking about how in iraq the awakening movement was a big turning point there, and clearly there's a sense that can be replicated. it seems to me the circumstances are different enough that to expect that kind of 180 turn like we had in iraq would be a bit problematic. >> well, again, i think it's worth, and most analysts would say it's worth trying. there is still in public opinion polls, most afghans did not support the taliban. there's a lot of allegations. it's definitely worth trying to win over some taliban to the government side. but you are correct that afghanistan and iraq are very different. will pakistan help? will iran help? >> do you think the people are susceptible to this agreement, or will they say, no, we're here for the long haul. we're going to win. >> i think th
can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> three bombings in a week, extremists in pakistan killing of these 19 people in another suicide attack. is it another ploy to buy time and rearm? the spanish government dismisses the cease-fire and vows to hunt the group down sworn in for a second term, the president attacks those he says presumed to give africans a lesson in human rights. welcome to bbc world news, broadcast in america on pbs and also around the world. he has turned to the nazis for inspiration. and remembering the london blitz of 70 years ago, and for the first time in color. ♪ >> hello to you. the taliban is saying they carried out a suicide bombing that demolished a police station in northwest pakistan, killing 19. in maciver region this was their third the suicide attack -- in the kayba region at this is the third suicide attacks in as many weeks. >> the blast left these police station in ruins. the bomber pack a car full of explosives and put it in an alley behind the building. heavy machinery had to be brought in to remove the rubble. >> we were at the polic
to protect hundreds of women and children. a huge bomb in northwestern pakistan kills at least 20. it is the second militant attack in as many days. and more than 1 million take to the streets against planned austerity measures dealing with french pension reform. welcome to bbc news. good to have you with us. we are broadcasting to our viewers in the united kingdom and around the world with me, james bagwell. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has spoken out against the plan to burn korans. general david petraeus said if it went ahead, images of the event would be used by insurgents to incite violence. coming up, we will hear what hillary clinton had to say with this report from washington. >> this is what worries general david petraeus is. 500 people in kabul, gather to demonstrate. one small church in america plans to bring copies of the koran. protesters threw rocks. >> we are concerned about the possible implications of a koran burning in the united states. it puts us in jeopardy. we have even seen trouble on just a rumor that this could take place, and i think that the i
or pakistan or africa 90% of ands come up and i think the as great tragedy we've lost that oral tradition and a rich tradition about folklore and heritage and faith and heritage. to honor that today i'd like to share with you a little story. it's a hard cover book that came out in march of 2006. anybody have a hard cover. wave it up here. you might not want it after i say this. i got to pick the title. three cups of tea but viking told me they would pick the subtitle and they picked one man mission to fight terrorism one school at a time. i objected because obviously there's- ways to fight tear riz m with education but i said i do this to promote peace and i started 8 years before 911 and this is about promoting peace through education. i've worked afghanistan and pakistan many years and i said we need to have a tribal council. i went to manhattan in the fall of 2005 and the big boss of the whole group, nancy shepherd and carlin coburn in publicity. we met in a little room and i stated my case and they said, this is your first book so you need to listen to a few things here. first of all
with top taliban leaders and lure foot soldiers off the battle field. in pakistan, there was even more reason than ever for insurgents to keep their eyes on the skies. national correspondent catherine herridge reports on an expanded effort by the u.s. to track down and kill militants from above. >> senior u.s. officials tell fox the drone campaign in the tribal areas of pakistan has intensified. more than 20 strikes this month. it's one of the highest monthly totals on record. national security analysts say the obama administration has embraced this program, a carryover from the bush administration. >> they can reach in places that we can't put troops into and many instances don't want to put troops into because of the enduring commitment that it might create. >> the targets are sometimes referred to as pakistan's witch's brew. among the group seeking shelter in the lawless border region with afghanistan, including osama bin laden and the afghani and pakistani taliban. the naturallized u.s. citizen tried and failed to set up a car bomb in new york's times square in may. the special env
the consequence of abandoning that effort now would be extremely serious for afghanistan, for pakistan, and for ultimately our own national security. >> i did agree with 100% of what you said. we have to try to get to the solution. i doubt whether we are winning the hearts and minds of the u.s. department of defense mission to congress as they have their propaganda machine. when you have a distrust of government, economically it pays -- [inaudible] you can earn more money in the taliban than the average salary. a recent survey suggested increasing number of afghans are becoming disillusioned with the direction that afghanistan is taking. what is your assessment of the heart and mind situation there? it does not feel like on the ground we're winning that either. that is an essential component of we're going to achieve any sort of success. >> there are service -- surveys. they have shown among the majority of people they do not want forces to leave afghanistan. that can lead to a contradictory. that does not suggest they want us to end their campaign. in my own experience of meeting peop
victims of pakistan. >> every time we saw a car in the area, it was surrounded by the people who have been hurt by the floods. the people we are here to help. >> the pope has issued a rallying cry for religion in an historic speech delivered to both houses of parliament. he said the world of faith and secular rationality needed one another for the good of civilization. allan little reports. ♪ >> the majesty of westminster's great hall pakastani centuries. this is the spot where the catholic martyr thomas mort was sentenced to death by the newly-protestant english states. [applause] with britain's contemporary earthly authority before him, the pope warned of the dangers of growing secularization of life in the west, the marginal as asian of christian -- marginalization of christian values. >> this is a contribution to allied national conversation. i voiced my concern at the increasing marginalization of religion, particularly christianity. [applause] >> as he met successive prime ministers, it seemed a rebuke, however polite, and also a warning. he wants the re-evangelization of the west.
president obama. it pastor decides he will not be burning copies of the koran. pakistan's former military leader talks to the bbc. a court -- very warm welcome to "bbc world news." coming up, keeping the peace on the blue line. we had a special report from one of the world's most sensitive borders. a cyclist searches for his son. the australian father who crossed nine countries to find his child is set for a reunion. >> the horror is in the tiny details. at one time it was happening in almost every diocese in every boarding school. there were hundreds of cases. allegations of sexual assault and belgium -- many surrounding clergy. it is another scandal for the catholic church to contemplate days before the pope's visit next week. >> in catholic-run boarding schools, the scale of the abuses revealed is shocking. it involved priests and teachers, and for some decades. >> i think it is safe to say every conservation was involved. all schools at some point knew of cases of child sex abuse. every diocese has been affected by this. the commission found the abuse was at its worst during the 1960'
are investigated. condemnation and protests in pakistan. day two of the pope state visit to britain. and he takes his defense of catholic teaching and tradition to london. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington and it afternoon in kabul where that afghan government has deployed more than 200,000 members of security forces to safeguard tomorrow's parliamentary elections. in the world -- words of the u.n. special envoy, one of the worst places in the worst times to have an election and were in the world. for the latest let's go live to kabul. >> here in the kabul, right across the country, security is exceptionally tight. policemen everywhere at key junctions in the capital. and yet intimidation and threats continued. 18 supporters of candidates were kidnapped today in the northwest of afghanistan. and another candidate was kidnapped this morning not far from kabul. more than three in the last two weeks according to the ports. yet with all of the threats and fears of violence, there is a lot of enthusiasm among the candidates. it 2005 hundred are competing for seats in the lower house of p
just starting to reach an apex in bangladesh. they're way ahead of india, and pakistan. it's an impact to stabilize the population there. also, um... excuse me. you know having hard cover thing fighting terrorism with education i've learned from islamic scholars. in the koran it's implicitly stated in the holy koran when a young mangos on jiha d and this is a spiritual endeavor to seek knowledge. it could also mean he's going into a group. but he has to get blessings from his mother first and if he doesn't do that it's shameful and disgraceful. after 911 the taliban had a high desertion rate and they were trying to get recruit groups to fight against intervention and coalition and they went in literally impoverished societies because educated women refused to allow they're sons to fight in theal bonn. you have a less educated mother here. single parent in the difficult system. the higher education a women has the more likely her son is to go on with education rather than getting into violence and drugs and certainly she won't condone her son getting into a gang or drugs. i
, developments on the battlefields in afghanistan and pakistan that are linked to the plot, apparently. here are key points. authorities say a german citizen of afghan descent is in custody spelling out the terror plan, like the terror plot in mumbai that killed 164 people two years ago. osama bin laden apparently approved the plan. no word so far if threats were also made against the united states. now, to the war zone in afghanistan and pakistan. nato says an air strike killed a top al qaeda commander in northern afghanistan along its border with pakistan. the u.s. recently increased the number of drone attacks in pakistan, and this may be due in part to information on the terror plot. drone targets in pakistan include taliban and al qaeda forces and militants linked to al qaeda. and the taliban denied claims made by the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, general david petraeus, that the taliban wants, was in contact with afghan government officials about possible peace talks. there's a lot going on, and we've got the story covered on all fronts. ivan watson in kabul, afghanistan. fred pla
labor organization warned the colossal floods in pakistan have destroyed the livelihoods of millions. more than 5 million jobs have been lost by the floods, reversing a decade of steady progress. the number of pakistanis living in poverty decreased by half. but now 100,000 mothers to be are at risk of disease or death. many babies will be delivered in squalor. off >> the desperate are taking refuge among the dead, trying to survive between ancient mausoleums. the graveyard is on a hill, the only dry ground for miles around. it was here that we found this woman waving the flies from the face of her four-day old son. he was born in the tent. >> he will not take my milk, not even border. he is very weak. -- not even water. >> the family says they have had no help at all. it is those yet to be born who could be the next victims. many of the women are pregnant and face giving birth in squalor. there is a doctor in the graveyard for 10,000 people. mohammed goes from ten to tent, but he is a man and women are reluctant to come to him for help. >> there will be many pregnant women. there mus
in emergency financing to flood-hit pakistan. managing director dominique strauss-kahn said in a statement on thursday that he'll ask the imf board to approve the financing this month. he said flooding in pakistan has caused serious damage to infrastructure and severely impacted the country's financial situation and economic outlook. emergency relief supplies are being sent to affected areas in pakistan. however, experts warn that more assistance may be needed because there are still many areas underwater. flooding across the indus river region has claimed more than 1,600 lives and affected more than 17 million people, or about 10% of the population. >>> in pakistan 2 out of 3 women can't read or write. the belief that women belong at home still prevails, making it impossible for many to get an education. but some are pressing ahead with the help of sympathetic organizations and a very familiar tool. nhk world's mobarik ahmed virk has more. >> translator: women need to study in this day and age. >> reporter: unesco and a local ngo hold a ceremony in a farming village in central pakistan. a
could not be higher. this is pakistan in 2005. 74,000 people were killed in this earthquake. 18,000 were kids going to school. most of the kids that died were younger and female because they didn't have desks so when the walls started shaking and the roof came down they perished. there was 9,000 schools destroyed or rendered unusable. 1/2 million kids displaced out of school. in earthquake, they call it the coy mot that means this apocalypse. at first there was a very heroic effort. infer natio international community helped. after katrina red cross got 2,000,000 for help and for this earthquake red cross received 6 million dollars. the united states sent in helicopters that conductd the greatest air lift in the history of mankind. moved about 20 thousand on thes in the mountains to keep 1/2 million people a hive during the wintertime. it was very heroic and people were grateful. aid has dropped 70 percent after a year in the wake of that void many jihad and people labeled terrorists have set up camps. this is one here. in pakistan. and in that camp, there are many kids that are previous
pakistan wants the burning astopped, calling it, quote, a crime against humanity. cnn's ed henry is working on it at the white house. pastor terry jones out florida outreach center said he's not convinced that backing down is not the thing to do. >> the vatican is also weighing in on the controversy. the church calling pastor jones' choice outrageous and brave. today, a large islamic group will announce an initiative to distribute 200,000 copies of the koran to replace the 200 copies that pastor jones plans to burn. we'll be joined by reverend larry rymer, he's the minister of a church in gainesville. he's trying get pastor jones to call off the koran burning. >>> we've got extreme weather to look at now, what's left of tropical storm hermine wreaking havoc across the dallas-ft. worth area. look at this, four funnel clouds. came out of nowhere. tearing apart a city block. leaving behind a cloud of debris. this is a close result. one truck driver was injured when the twister picked up his rig and slammed it into a warehouse. >> i stopped to see if there was anybody hurt. i got over there, wa
in pakistan 20 times in the past 23 days at least by my count from what i can figure from reports. no one really pays attention to us shooting missiles into pakistan anymore. it just gets filed into drone strikes. i know what those mean. we have ceased really worrying about them, but we've never done them at this pace before, at least as far as we can tell from what's being reported. why are we doing them so fast and furious now? is it because we have better intelligence than before so we know more about what we should be shooting at there? does it have the fact that the pakistani government seems as inured to those drone strikes as the american government does? they have stopped their complaining about using our unmanned robot planes to shoot people in their territory even as our own country's leadership will not readily admit that we are doing that. but we have never done them at this pace before. are things happening there at such an intensity because we have better intelligence? are they doing that? does it have anything to do with the pakistani governor's take on all of this? when th
of the world usually, like pakistan. i have been observing what is going on with the kurds. on 16th street, they have their own sort of that many embassy. what i call it that? i do not know. with that in mind, the region, the need, and everything, can both of these take a little further to the kurdish issue? >> thank you. one of the things that we said to all of our people is that the united states is deeply committed to helping the kurds sustain the significant gains that have made in iraq in terms of being fully and meaningfully integrated into the life and their ship of the nation but also retaining the day in and day out control of their daily lives. this is something we could strongly about. what is very interesting is that in the context of the discussions going back and forth there is an understanding by other leading coalitions in iraq that to both get a government and then to have a government that functions, you have to address the outstanding concerns of the kurdish region. they are in a good position to make sure that their interests are taken into account and the issues they p
the united states and pakistan may be at a new low tonight, and that tension is not a good thing for the u.s. strategy against terrorism. pakistan has now blocked a vital supply route into afghanistan after a helicopter strike killed three pakistani troops along the border. pakistanis say it was a nato chopper that unleashed that strike. our own john yang is on duty tonight in kabul. john, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. tonight, general david petraeus, the top u.s. commander here, has reached out to officials in pakistan to offer his condolences for the deaths. but nato officials aren't yet ready to accept responsibility. pakistan wasted no time responding to the death of these three soldiers, killed at a border post in pakistan's tribal region by apache attack helicopters. the choppers were supporting ground forces in afghanistan, who thought they spotted insurgents firing mortars. nato officials say the apaches took small arms fire from inside pakistan. >> operating in self-defense, the aircraft entered into pakistani air space, killing several armed individuals. >> repo
. dr. sanjay gupta is in pakistan with the youngest flood victims. >>> and blowing up tanks, literally. how inflatable artillery could change everything we know about waging war. >>> we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> as i've said from the start, there's no quick fix to the worst recession we've experienced since the great depression. the hard truth is that it took years to create our current economic problems. and it will take more time than any of us would like to repair the damage. millions of our neighbors are living with that painfully every day. but i want all americans to remind themselves, there are better days ahead. >> president obama speaking ahead of a labor day weekend, which finds more americans without jobs. the labor department says the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a percent in august to 9.6%. as the economy shed 54,000 jobs. the loss was better than some analysts were predicting, but that's unlikely to help the president's poor approval rating when it comes to the eco
of margins. after the flood, the aid of appeal in pakistan is boosted by help from hollywood. >> is not just at tent washed away. it is a collapse of their entire life. >> welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- man of iron. as -- does it vladimir putin hope for another stint as president? and how the parsis community is trying to secure the survival of their community and religion. heller to you. hundreds of thousands of protesters have been on the streets of france, demonstrating their anger at government austerity measures. a 24-hour strike has disrupted flights, trains, and closed schools. president sarkozy wants to raise the retirement age from 60 to 6 2, say the changes are unavoidable. we have this from paris. >> choked with protest. a vast crowds have come out against plans to raise the retirement age from 60 to six detail. there was also a major disruption to transport as workers went on strike. this nurse complained, we worked nights, weekends, public holidays. we do not get a
in the program, 20 killed in a suicide bomb attack in the northwest of pakistan. a resurgence of extremist violence in the aftermath of the flood. securing the streets after new zealand's earthquake -- the army takes control as a family's count the cost. it is midday here in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington. it is 4:00 p.m. in the afternoon in mumbai. that is where the report comes from concerning illegal gambling -- four players were involved during the recent war in england -- it has highlighted this and get back to make millions from the outcome of a single game. a look at how in the end gains are at the heart of an international network for cricket and criminality come together. >> mumbai, the maximum city of north dakota, and the center of cricket illegal gambling industry. adowy as part of the shuttle world. with millions of dollars been bet, the stakes are high. >> it is not new, and will continue. millions have been bet, and make moneyne tends to through. despite the controls, people are still gambling today. bookies make bets on every ball, every session. gambling runs in the blood
across pakistan but the people here are poor and even now feel very much forgotten. this man and his family were forced to move from what used to be their house to this borrowed tent. it's been a terrible time for us, he says. i walk to the main road hoping for handouts of food and water but it never comes. to add to his problems, his daughter had to have an operation after getting a severe infection. his other children are all ill from drinking dirty water, but in these circumstances he and countless others like him have very few options. bbc news in southern punjab. >>. hugo chavez of venezuela has insisted that he will not accept the u.s. government's nominee for ambassador and he warned the ambassador not to travel to venezuela because he wouldn't be allowed to enter the country. correspondent will grant is in caracas and joins me now. tell us more about this standoff between chavez and the prospective ambassador. >> back a couple months, larry palmer the potential ambassador was addressing the house committee and said that there was cuban influence in the venezuelaan military an
from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the future. >> i want to design... >> a better solar cell. >> i want to know what's really possible. >> i want to be the first to cure cancer. >> people don't really understand why things work. >> i want to be that person that finds out why. >> innovative young minds taking on tomorrow's toughest challenges. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,067 (some duplicates have been removed)